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Bateel Skycraper


Old Horse, New Design

Old Horse, New Design

Issue 95 August 2012

Volvos have a reputation for reliability, comfort, and workmanship. Fazeel Ashraf drives the new V60 and admires the new-look design.


It is not always about glamour, glitz, and over the top look-at-me-in-my-nice-new-shiny attention seeking speed mobile. We would all love to ride into the sunset in our convertibles, but for most of us there is as much chance of that happening as the price of petrol falling below a pound a litre. In the real world, where we have to ferry children around, pick up a few bit and bobs from the local supermarket before stopping off at Uncle Tariq’s to drop of your latest chutney creation, practicality rules. What could then be more sensible than a Volvo estate? Hearing the word Volvo seems to be a tried and tested method in putting someone to sleep and something I will admit to suffering from time to time. It does not help that I remember my math teacher, Mr Rollinson, drive around in one for years and years. It also does not help that a Volvo estate conjures up images of someone with fourteen strands of hair trying to cover up an expansive bald patch, whilst wearing corduroy trousers that match the golf bag in the back of the car. Despite all that, Volvo remained convinced that the V60 can be cool and hip.

If you look solely at its proportion and silhouette, it actually does not look like much of an estate at all. In fact any clues of a traditional estate influenced by the design of a wheelie bin have gone. The V60 is curvaceous while at the same time giving a raked sleek profile. Every corner, light, and handle has been sculpted with young fashionistas in mind. 


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